Best Walks in the Peak District for Weekend Adventurers
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20 Best Walks in the Peak District (with OS Map Routes)

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In this comprehensive guide, I’ll be sharing 20 of the best walks in the Peak District, many of which are my personal favourites that I’ve walked several times over the years.

I may have ventured far and wide, but my heart always brings me back to the Peak District. I grew up not too far from this stunning national park, and I return several times a year. Yes, there are bigger mountains to conquer elsewhere, but there’s something irresistibly charming about the Peak District that keeps drawing me back.

From the rugged landscapes of the Dark Peak to the rolling hills of the White Peak, the Peak District offers a diverse range of terrains that cater to walkers of all levels. Whether you’re looking for a short walk with the family or a challenging trek to the highest point in the area, there’s something here for everyone.

The Best Walks in the Peak District


Kinder Scout via Grindsbrook Clough and Jacob’s Ladder

DISTANCE

12 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

3-4 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

508 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

Kinder Scout! Not only is it the highest point in the Peak District, but it’s also a place that holds a special spot in my heart. If you’re up for a steep climb and a rewarding circular walk, this route is perfect for you. Starting from Edale, a charming village that also serves as the starting point for the Pennine Way, this walk offers some of the most breathtaking landscapes the Dark Peak has to offer.

The Circular Walk

This particular route is a favourite of mine because it offers a bit of everything. You’ll start your journey heading up Grindsbrook Clough, a lovely walk that takes you through open fields and limestone valleys. Once you reach the Kinder plateau, you’ll loop back towards Jacob’s Ladder for your descent. This circular route ensures you get to experience the best views from different angles.

Don’t be deterred by the initial steep inclines; the views from the trig point at the top are nothing short of spectacular. On a clear day, you can even see as far as Greater Manchester.

Late summer is an excellent time for this walk. The weather is generally more forgiving, and the Kinder plateau is awash with colour, making it the perfect walk for those looking to capture some great views.

Edale is only a small village, so parking can be an issue on the very busy summer days. It’s best to get there early if you can and use the village hall car park.

Postcode – S33 7ZP

There are a couple of good pubs in the village, and they’re perfect for those post-hike refreshments.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

What sets this walk apart for me is the variety it offers. From steep inclines to open country, every mile walked is a new experience. And let’s not forget the mass trespass of Kinder Scout, a pivotal moment in walking history that opened up many of the paths we enjoy today. That’s why this list of the best walks in the Peak District has to start with Kinder Scout.


Padley Gorge

DISTANCE

8.5 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

2 hrs 10

ELEVATION GAIN

253 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

If you’re looking for a walk that offers more than just open fields and steep hills, Padley Gorge is your perfect place. Nestled near the village of Hathersage, this beautiful walk takes you through a woodland wonderland that feels almost magical, especially in the autumn.

Best Walks in the Peak District

The Walk

Padley Gorge is a relatively easy walk, making it ideal for families or anyone looking for a shorter route. The trail takes you along the River Derwent, through lush forests and past some of the area’s most picturesque limestone dales. It’s a lovely walk that offers a different kind of beauty compared to the rugged terrains of the Dark Peak.

Autumn is hands-down my favourite time to visit Padley Gorge. There’s something incredibly special about walking through the woods with low-hanging fog weaving through the trees. The atmosphere is simply enchanting, and the autumnal colours add an extra layer of beauty to the landscape.

The Longshaw Estate visitor centre is not too far from the start point, offering walking routes, maps, and even some ice cream for those looking to treat themselves after the walk.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

Padley Gorge offers a unique walking experience that’s a bit different from the more challenging terrains in the Peak District. The combination of the river, the woodland, and the limestone valleys creates a diverse landscape that never fails to impress. And let’s not forget that special atmosphere that only autumn can bring. This is definitely one of the best walks in the Peak District.


Stanage Edge

DISTANCE

11 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

3-4 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

420 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

Stanage Edge is more than just a great place for rock climbers; it’s a walker’s paradise offering some of the best views in the Peak District. Located in the Dark Peak area, this walk is a must-visit for anyone looking to capture the perfect landscape photo or simply enjoy the great outdoors.

The Walk

This walk takes you along the top of Stanage Edge, offering spectacular views over the Hope Valley and the surrounding areas. The terrain is a mix of open country and rocky outcrops, making it a diverse and interesting route. It’s a relatively short walk, but the steep hills can make it a bit challenging, so come prepared.

You can also make it a longer walk by starting and finishing in Hathersage. This way you can also head up to the summit of Higger Tor as you loop around.

The last time I did this walk, I arrived really early in the morning and stumbled upon some wild campers just packing up after a night on the top. Seeing them there, I couldn’t help but add wild camping at Stanage Edge to my bucket list. Imagine waking up to those incredible views—it’s something I plan to experience soon. And if the weather turned nasty in the night, there’s always Robin Hood’s Cave to shelter in.

Stanage Edge is a year-round destination, but if you’re looking for the clearest day to capture those great views, late summer to early autumn is ideal.

There’s a National Trust car park near the start point, making it easy to access the walking route. Maps and other information can also be found at the visitor centre in the nearby village of Hathersage.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

Stanage Edge offers a unique blend of natural beauty and adventure. Whether you’re into rock climbing or just want to enjoy a short distance walk with steep inclines and breathtaking vistas, this is the place for you.


Monsal Trail

DISTANCE

13 km one way

ESTIMATED TIME

3-4 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

399 m

DIFFICULTY

Easy

The Monsal Trail is a bit of a local gem, offering a unique walking experience that’s quite different from the steep inclines and rugged terrains of other Peak District walks. Located in the White Peak area, this trail is a multi-use route, making it popular for both walking and cycling. I’ve cycled it several times, but walking it offers its own set of joys.

The Walk

The Monsal Trail is an easy walk that takes you along a disused railway line. One of the highlights of this trail is walking through several old railway tunnels. These tunnels add an element of adventure to the walk and are a hit with kids and adults alike. The trail also offers beautiful views of the River Derwent and Monsal Dale, making it a perfect walk for those looking for something less strenuous.

While the Monsal Trail is a great place for a walk, it’s also a popular route for cycling. If you’re up for a different kind of adventure, I highly recommend bringing your bike along. The flat terrain makes it an easy ride, perfect for a good day out with the family.

The Monsal Trail, Peak District

The Monsal Trail is a year-round destination, but if you’re looking to avoid the crowds, weekdays or early mornings are your best bet.

There’s ample parking available at the start of the walk, usually near Monsal Head. You’ll also find several visitor centres along the trail where you can pick up maps and grab a quick ice cream.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

What I love about the Monsal Trail is its versatility. Whether you’re walking or cycling, the trail offers a relaxed yet beautiful route that’s accessible to adventurers of all ages. The old railway tunnels and the views over Monsal Dale make it a memorable experience.


Chee Dale

DISTANCE

12 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

3-4 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

431 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

Chee Dale is a hidden gem in the Peak District, offering a walk that’s a bit off the beaten path. Nestled in the White Peak area, this walk is perfect for those looking to explore limestone caves, cliffs, and the beautiful River Wye.

The Walk

Chee Dale is a relatively short walk, but don’t let that fool you—it packs a punch in terms of natural beauty. The trail takes you along the River Wye, through narrow limestone dales and across a series of stepping stones. It’s a beautiful walk that offers a mix of open country and more enclosed, intimate spaces.

Chee Dale is accessible year-round, but if you’re looking for the best experience, late summer to early autumn is ideal. The water levels are generally lower, making it easier to cross the stepping stones.

Parking is available near the start point, and while there’s no visitor centre, the trail is well-marked. Just make sure to bring plenty of water as it can get quite warm, especially during the late summer months.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

Chee Dale offers a unique walking experience that’s unlike any other in the Peak District. The limestone caves and cliffs provide a dramatic backdrop, and the stepping stones add an element of fun and adventure to the walk. It’s a perfect place for a lovely walk, especially if you’re looking to escape the more crowded routes.


Bamford Edge

DISTANCE

12 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

3 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

352 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

Bamford Edge is one of those walks that you’ll want to bring your camera along for. Offering some of the best views in the Peak District, especially over Ladybower Reservoir, this walk is a must for anyone looking to capture the perfect landscape shot.

Bamford Edge

The Walk

This is a relatively short walk, but the steep climb to the top of Bamford Edge is well worth the effort. Once you reach the summit, you’ll be rewarded with panoramic views that stretch across the Hope Valley and Ladybower Reservoir. It’s a great place for photography, so make sure your camera is fully charged!

You can also choose to make this a longer route by combining it with Stanage Edge for a circular route.

Bamford Edge is a year-round destination, but for the clearest views, late summer to early autumn is your best bet. On a clear day, you can even see as far as the Greater Manchester area.

The easiest place to park for Bamford Edge is on New Road, which is an off-road car park right by the entrance of the walk. The postcode for the Bamford Edge parking area is New Road, Bamford, S33 0AD.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

What sets Bamford Edge apart is the sheer beauty of the views it offers. Whether you’re looking at the open fields of the Hope Valley or the waters of Ladybower Reservoir, the scenery is simply breathtaking. It’s the perfect place for a short walk that offers great views without requiring a full day’s commitment.


Kinder Downfall

DISTANCE

14 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

3-4 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

554 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

Kinder Downfall is not just a waterfall; it’s an experience. Located on the western side of the Kinder Scout plateau, this walk offers a steep climb, open fields, and the reward of seeing one of the Peak District’s most iconic waterfalls.

The Walk

The route starts from the Bowden Bridge car park near Hayfield, with the postcode SK22 2LE for easy navigation. The trail takes you through open fields and well-trodden paths, leading up to the Kinder plateau. Once you reach the plateau, it’s a short distance to Kinder Downfall. Especially after heavy rainfall, the waterfall turns into a torrential cascade that’s truly a sight to behold.

In the depths of winter, the waterfall can completely freeze over. I’ve even seen climbers making their way up the frozen fall using crampons and ice axes. It’s an incredible sight and adds an extra layer of adventure to this already thrilling walk.

Late summer to early autumn is an excellent time for this walk. The weather is generally more stable, and you’ll need plenty of water for the steep inclines, so it’s good to go when the weather is milder.

The Bowden Bridge car park near Hayfield is the usual starting point for this walk. Make sure to wear appropriate footwear, as the area can get muddy, especially in wet weather.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

What sets Kinder Downfall apart is the sheer drama of the landscape. The steep climb, the expansive Kinder plateau, and the waterfall itself make this walk a memorable experience. Whether you’re witnessing the waterfall in its full flow or seeing it frozen solid in winter, it’s a walk that offers something unique in every season.


Lose Hill

DISTANCE

10 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

3 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

474 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

Lose Hill is one of those walks that offers a lot without requiring a full day’s commitment. Located at one end of the famous Great Ridge, this walk provides panoramic views of the surrounding Hope Valley and is a perfect introduction to what the Peak District has to offer.

The Walk

The walk to the summit of Lose Hill is relatively straightforward, making it an easy walk that’s accessible to hikers of all levels. The trail takes you through open fields and offers a gradual ascent to the top, where you’ll find a trig point marking the summit. From here, you can enjoy great views of the Great Ridge, Mam Tor, and even the distant Pennine Way.

Lose Hill is a year-round destination, but for the best visibility and to enjoy the landscape in all its glory, late summer to early autumn is ideal.

There’s a car park near the starting point, usually around the village of Castleton. The area is well-signposted, and you’ll find maps and other information at the visitor centre in Castleton.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

What I love about Lose Hill is its accessibility. It’s an easy walk that still offers some of the best views in the Peak District. Whether you’re a seasoned hiker or just looking for a short walk with great views, Lose Hill is a fantastic option.


Mam Tor and the Great Ridge

DISTANCE

10 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

2-3 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

367 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

Mam Tor, also known as the “Shivering Mountain,” is a must-visit for anyone exploring the Peak District. Combined with the Great Ridge, this walk offers a mix of steep inclines, open fields, and panoramic views that are simply breathtaking.

The Walk

The walk starts from the National Trust car park near the village of Castleton, with the postcode S33 8WA serving as a handy reference for navigation. The trail takes you up to the summit of Mam Tor, marked by a trig point, and then along the Great Ridge. From the top of Mam Tor, you’ll enjoy great views that stretch across the Hope Valley and even as far as the Pennine Way.

Mam Tor, Peak District

Circular Walk Option

For those interested in a circular route, you can extend your walk to include Cave Dale, a limestone valley that offers a different but equally stunning perspective of the Peak District. As you make your way through Cave Dale, you’ll also catch sight of Peveril Castle, adding a historical touch to your scenic walk. This loop will take you back to the village of Castleton, making it a perfect circular walk.

Mam Tor and the Great Ridge are accessible year-round, but for the best experience, late summer to early autumn is ideal. The weather is generally more stable, and the visibility is excellent for those great views.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

I’m sure that Mam Tor makes it onto every list of the best walks in the Peak District. Mam Tor and the Great Ridge offer a walking experience that’s both challenging and rewarding. The steep inclines will get your heart pumping, but the views from the top are well worth the effort. Whether you’re looking to capture the perfect landscape shot or simply enjoy a day out in the open country, this walk has something for everyone.


Pennine Way

DISTANCE

417 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

16-19 days

ELEVATION GAIN

11,923 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

The Pennine Way is a bit of an outlier on this list, mainly because it’s a long-distance walk that spans over 268 miles from Edale to Kirk Yetholm. However, we’ve included it because it’s an incredible experience that can be broken down into smaller, more manageable sections, perfect for tackling over multiple weekends.

While I haven’t walked the full route myself, I’ve had the pleasure of exploring several sections. Completing the entire Pennine Way is definitely on my bucket list, and I highly recommend it as a long-term project for any avid walker.

The Walk

The Pennine Way starts in Edale, which is also the starting point for several other walks on this list, including Kinder Scout. The trail takes you through a variety of landscapes, from open fields and moorlands to steep hills and valleys. While it’s a long walk, you can easily break it down into smaller chunks, each offering its own set of unique views and challenges.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

The Pennine Way offers a walking experience like no other. Its sheer length and variety of landscapes make it a challenging but rewarding endeavour. What I love most is the flexibility it offers; you can tackle it in smaller sections over multiple weekends, making it a perfect long-term project for any avid walker.


Win Hill

DISTANCE

8 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

2-3 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

323 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

Win Hill is a fantastic walk that offers some of the best views in the Peak District. Located near the village of Hope, this hill provides a moderately challenging ascent and panoramic vistas that make the climb well worth it.

A couple of years ago, I tackled this walk in deep snow. The landscape was transformed into a winter wonderland, and the experience was both challenging and magical. It’s a walk I’ll never forget.

The Walk

The walk usually starts from the village of Hope, and the trail takes you through open fields before ascending to the summit. Once you reach the top, you’ll find a trig point marking the highest point, offering spectacular views of the surrounding Hope Valley and Ladybower Reservoir.

Win Hill is accessible year-round, but each season offers its own unique experience. Whether you’re walking in the lush greenery of late summer or the snowy landscapes of winter, you’re in for a treat.

There’s a car park near the starting point in Hope, and the area is well-signposted. Maps and other information can usually be found at the visitor centre in Hope.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

Win Hill offers a great balance between effort and reward. The climb is moderately challenging, but the views from the top are simply stunning. Whether you’re looking for a short walk with great views or a more challenging hike in varied conditions, Win Hill is a fantastic option.


The Roaches and Lud’s Church

DISTANCE

11 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

2-3 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

348 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

The Roaches and Lud’s Church walk is a journey through some of the Peak District’s most captivating landscapes. From the rugged rock formations of The Roaches to the mystical, moss-covered Lud’s Church, this walk is a feast for the senses. This list of the best walks in the Peak District isn’t in any particular order, but if it were, this one would be near the top.

The Roaches

I’ve always been fascinated by the blend of natural beauty and local folklore that surrounds this area. The Roaches offer a playground for rock climbers, while Lud’s Church, with its mossy walls and ethereal atmosphere, feels like stepping into another world. I’ve even done this walk in the middle of the night, and let me tell you, Lud’s Church is a spooky place to be in the dead of night.

The Walk

The walk starts from a car park near the village of Upper Hulme. The trail takes you up to The Roaches, a popular spot for rock climbers, offering great views of the surrounding countryside. From there, you’ll descend into the woodland to find Lud’s Church, a deep chasm covered in moss and ferns, said to be a hiding place for Robin Hood and his Merry Men.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

The Roaches and Lud’s Church offer a walking experience that’s both physically rewarding and spiritually enriching. The varied landscapes, from the rocky outcrops of The Roaches to the mystical depths of Lud’s Church, make this walk a must-do for anyone looking to explore the Peak District’s more mystical side.


Thor’s Cave

DISTANCE

5 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

1-2 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

196 m

DIFFICULTY

Easy

Thor’s Cave is an awe-inspiring natural cavern that offers a unique walking experience in the Peak District. Located in the Manifold Valley, this limestone cave is a must-see for anyone interested in geology, history, or simply looking for an adventurous walk.

I’ve always been captivated by the sense of mystery that surrounds Thor’s Cave. The cave itself is a geological marvel, and the views from its mouth are simply breathtaking. It’s a great place to ponder the forces of nature that have shaped this landscape over millennia.

Best Walks peak District

The Walk

The walk usually starts from the village of Wetton or from a nearby car park. The trail takes you through limestone valleys and up a steep climb to the cave’s entrance. Once inside, you can explore the cave and enjoy spectacular views of the surrounding Manifold Valley.

Thor’s Cave is accessible year-round, but for the best experience, late spring to early autumn is ideal. The weather is generally more stable, and the visibility from the cave’s mouth offers some of the best views in the Peak District.

There’s a car park near the starting point in Wetton, and the area is well-signposted. Maps and other information can usually be found at local visitor centres.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

Thor’s Cave offers a unique blend of adventure and natural beauty. The steep climb to the cave’s entrance adds a touch of excitement, while the views from the cave itself are truly awe-inspiring. I’ve had a fascination with caves since I was a little kid, and I’ll never pass up the opportunity to explore one. Whether you’re an avid geologist or just looking for a walk that’s a bit out of the ordinary, Thor’s Cave is a fantastic option.


Edale Skyline

DISTANCE

27 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

7-8 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

860 m

DIFFICULTY

Severe

The Edale Skyline is a lesser-known gem that offers some of the best panoramic views in the Peak District. Initially popular as a trail running route, this circular walk takes in the very best scenery around Edale and Kinder Scout.

Edale Skyline is an epic route for those who are up for a challenge. While it’s a popular route among trail runners, there’s no way that I could run that far, but luckily it also offers a fantastic walking experience. The route takes you through a variety of landscapes, from the rugged terrain of Kinder Scout to the lush valleys of Edale.

The Walk

The walk usually starts from Edale train station, making it easily accessible for those travelling by public transport. The trail takes you up to the Kinder Plateau, through the Edale Valley, and along the Great Ridge, offering a variety of terrains and spectacular views at every turn.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

The Edale Skyline offers a unique walking experience that combines the best of both worlds: the challenge of a trail running route and the scenic beauty of a walking path. Whether you’re looking for a long walk that takes in a variety of landscapes or a shorter route that still offers great views, the Edale Skyline is definitely one of the best walks in the Peak District.


Winnats Pass

DISTANCE

8 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

2-3 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

387 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

Winnats Pass is a stunning limestone gorge that has become a must-visit spot in the Peak District, especially for photographers. The dramatic cliffs and winding road make it a popular subject for Instagram posts, capturing the essence of the Peak District’s rugged beauty.

I’ve always loved the dramatic scenery at Winnats Pass. It’s become a hotspot for photographers, and it’s easy to see why. The towering limestone cliffs and the winding road create a scene that’s just begging to be captured on camera.

Best Walks Peak District

The Walk

The walk usually starts from the village of Castleton, which is also a great place to explore before or after your hike. The trail takes you up the steep inclines of the gorge, offering spectacular views of the surrounding countryside and the village of Castleton below.

Winnats Pass is accessible year-round, but for the best photographic opportunities, early morning or late afternoon provides the most dramatic lighting.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

Winnats Pass offers a unique blend of natural beauty and photographic potential. The steep hills and dramatic cliffs make for a challenging but rewarding walk, and the area has become a popular spot for photographers looking to capture the perfect shot.


Dovedale

DISTANCE

6.5 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

2 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

271 m

DIFFICULTY

Easy

Dovedale is a classic Peak District walk that offers a delightful blend of river valleys, limestone caves, and modest peaks like Thorpe Cloud. It’s a perfect family-friendly walk, and for many, it serves as an introduction to hiking in the Peak District.

Dovedale holds a special place in my heart as it was one of the first hikes I ever did. I remember it vividly—a family day out during the summer holidays. Back then, the modest Thorpe Cloud felt like a real mountain to me, and I felt like a proper adventurer as I followed the River Dove and scrambled up to the caves.

The Walk

The walk usually starts from the Dovedale car park near the village of Thorpe. The trail takes you along the River Dove, through open fields, and up to Thorpe Cloud, offering a variety of terrains and beautiful views at every turn.

Dovedale is accessible year-round, but it does get very busy during the summer months, especially at the weekends. Personally, I prefer it to be quiet, so I’d always choose to go on a weekday or out of season.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

Dovedale is a walk that’s close to my heart. The varied landscapes, from the tranquil River Dove to the adventurous scramble up Thorpe Cloud, make it a walk that offers something for everyone, from young adventurers to seasoned hikers.


Chrome Hill and Parkhouse Hill

DISTANCE

10.5 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

3 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

555 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

Chrome Hill and Parkhouse Hill, often referred to as the “dragon’s back,” are neighbouring limestone ridges that offer some of the most unique landscapes in the Peak District. Their distinct shapes and panoramic views make them favourites among hikers and landscape photographers alike.

Chrome Hill and Parkhouse Hill are among my favourite walks in the Peak District. Their unique “dragon’s back” topography and stunning vistas make them a landscape photographer’s dream. I’ve spent many hours here, capturing the changing light and shadows across these remarkable ridges.

Best Walks in the Peak District

The Walk

The walk usually starts from on-street parking near the church in the village of Earl Sterndale. The trail takes you through open country and up the steep inclines of both Chrome Hill and Parkhouse Hill, offering a moderately challenging but rewarding experience.

These hills are accessible year-round, but for the best photographic opportunities, early morning or late afternoon offers the most dramatic lighting conditions.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

Chrome Hill and Parkhouse Hill offer a unique blend of natural beauty and photographic potential. Their distinct “dragon’s back” shapes and the panoramic views from their summits make them must-visits for any avid hiker or landscape photographer.


Dovestone Reservoir and the Trinnacles

DISTANCE

9.5 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

2-3 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

245 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

Dovestone Reservoir and the Trinnacles offer a unique blend of tranquil waterscapes and rugged rock formations. The Trinnacles, in particular, have become a popular spot for daring individuals looking to climb up for that perfect photo.

The Walk

The walk usually starts from a car park near Dovestone Reservoir. The trail takes you around the reservoir and up to the Trinnacles, offering a moderately challenging but rewarding experience.

I’ve been intrigued by the Trinnacles since I started seeing photos shared on Instagram. Their towering presence near Dovestone Reservoir adds an element of adventure to this otherwise tranquil walk. It’s become a hotspot for those daring enough to climb up for a photo, adding a sense of excitement to the area.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

Dovestone Reservoir and the Trinnacles offer a unique walking experience that combines natural beauty with a touch of adventure. The Trinnacles, in particular, have become a popular spot for those daring enough to climb up for a photo, adding an extra layer of excitement to this walk.


The Limestone Way

DISTANCE

75 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

3-4 hr days

ELEVATION GAIN

1905 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

The Limestone Way is a long-distance walking route that takes you through the heart of the Peak District’s limestone dales. While it’s a substantial walk, it’s much shorter than the Pennine Way, making it a great option for those building up their confidence and fitness for bigger challenges.

It offers a great balance for those who are looking to take on a substantial challenge but aren’t quite ready for something as daunting as the Pennine Way.

The Walk

The full Limestone Way stretches from Castleton to Rocester, covering a distance of approximately 46 miles. Highlights along the route include the stunning limestone valleys, Peveril Castle, and the village of Monyash, known for its beautiful dales and historic landmarks.

Limestone Way Start and Finish Points

  • Starting Point: Castleton
  • Finishing Point: Rocester

Why It’s One of My Favourites

The Limestone Way offers a unique long-distance walking experience that serves as a great introduction to multi-day hiking. Its shorter length compared to the Pennine Way makes it an excellent choice for those looking to build up to more challenging adventures.


Alport Castles

DISTANCE

15 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

4-5 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

640 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

Alport Castles is not just another walk in the Peak District; it’s a hidden gem that offers everything from easy-to-follow trails to stunning views over hills and moorland. The area is known for its impressive gritstone outcrops, often referred to as “The Tower,” which resemble the tower of a castle.

I did this walk back in January on a cold but clear morning. Despite being a frequent visitor to the areas surrounding Ladybower Reservoir, this was my first time heading in the direction of Alport Castles. The walk is just over nine miles, making it a substantial but rewarding journey. The imposing pinnacles and rocky outcrops make this walk well worth the effort.

The Walk

The walk starts from the northern end of Ladybower Reservoir, near the Upper Derwent Visitor’s Centre. After a long but gentle climb, the trail reaches an open moorland plateau and heads over to Alport Castles. The area is perfect for scrambling over rocks and finding perfect angles for photos.

While the rocky terrain around Alport Castles could be treacherous in wet and icy conditions, it’s a great route all year round. I personally went on a bitterly cold winter’s day and thoroughly enjoyed it.

Parking for this route is near the Upper Derwent Visitor Centre. There are several laybys with free parking if you arrive early, as well as a pay-and-display car park at the visitor centre (Postcode: S33 0AQ). The centre also has a cafe and toilet facilities.

Why It’s One of My Favourites

Alport Castles offers a unique blend of natural beauty and geological intrigue. It’s a less-mentioned route in the Peak District, making it a quieter but equally rewarding experience. Plus, there’s the chance to spot Peregrine Falcons nesting in the crags.


Exploring the Peak District National Park has been a lifelong passion of mine, and I’m thrilled to share these 20 incredible walks with you. From the towering heights of Kinder Scout to the geological wonders of Alport Castles, there’s something here for every adventurer. Whether you’re a seasoned hiker looking for your next challenge or a weekend wanderer seeking a lovely walk, the Peak District offers a diverse range of experiences that promise spectacular views and unforgettable moments. So lace up those hiking boots, grab your camera, and set out to discover the best walks the Peak District has to offer. Happy hiking!

Make it a Weekend Adventure

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