Best Walks in Snowdonia
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HomeHiking20 Best Walks in Snowdonia (With OS Map Routes)
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20 Best Walks in Snowdonia (With OS Map Routes)

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Snowdonia National Park is a treasure trove for walkers, a place where each trail tells its own unique story. I’ve been fortunate to spend over 20 years exploring this incredible landscape, and it never ceases to amaze me. Whether you’re scaling the iconic heights of Snowdon, navigating the rugged terrain of Tryfan, or enjoying the panoramic views from Cnicht, there’s a walk in Snowdonia to match every level of skill and enthusiasm. This isn’t just a list of trails; it’s a collection of experiences that have shaped my love for this region. If you’re looking to discover the best walks in Snowdonia, you’ve come to the right place.

In this in-depth guide, I’ll share my top 20 trails, complete with insights on their difficulty levels, standout features, and tips to enhance your walking adventure. So, lace up those hiking boots and let’s get started—Snowdonia’s natural beauty awaits

Why Snowdonia?

Snowdonia National Park is more than just a scenic backdrop; it’s an adventurer’s playground spread across 823 square miles in North Wales. From its craggy cliffs to its tranquil waterways, this national park offers a multitude of experiences that make it a top destination for walking and hiking.

Snowdonia is a feast for the eyes, offering vistas that range from expansive moorlands to secluded valleys. Whether you’re standing atop one of its many peaks or wandering through its hidden glens, the views are nothing short of breathtaking.

The park is a hiker’s dream, offering trails that cater to all skill levels. Whether you’re in the mood for a short walk around a picturesque lake or up for a challenging hike along a rugged ridge, Snowdonia has you covered. The variety of terrains also means that every walk offers a unique set of challenges and rewards, from navigating rocky terrain to discovering ancient woodlands.

Snowdonia is steeped in history, adding a cultural richness to your hiking experience. The area’s industrial heritage, particularly evident along the Snowdonia Slate Trail, offers fascinating insights into the lives of communities that have called this region home for generations.

Each season in Snowdonia brings its own unique charm. Spring offers blooming flora and milder temperatures, making it an ideal time for those looking to avoid the summer crowds. Autumn paints the landscape in a palette of warm hues, while winter provides the thrill of navigating snow-covered paths and the chance to witness the beauty of frozen lakes and icy waterfalls.

How to Use OS Map Routes

To make your walking experience as smooth as possible, I’ve included links to the OS Maps routes for each of the 20 walks. This way, you can easily plan your journey, know what to expect, and make the most of your time in Snowdonia. Whether you’re a map aficionado or new to the world of outdoor navigation, these OS Maps will be your indispensable guide on the trail.

Navigating through Snowdonia’s diverse landscapes can be both rewarding and challenging. That’s why it’s crucial to have reliable mapping tools at your disposal. OS Map Routes are an invaluable resource for any walker or hiker looking to explore Snowdonia safely and efficiently. As one of Ordnance Survey’s Get Outside Champions, I’m proud to advocate for the use of these trusted mapping tools.

These maps come loaded with features that make them both user-friendly and incredibly detailed. Expect to find information on elevation gain, alternative routes, and points of interest, helping you plan your walk down to the last detail.

You can access these maps in various ways, including purchasing physical copies or using digital versions available on apps and websites.

Tips for Effective Navigation

When using OS Map Routes, it’s essential to understand how to read contour lines, symbols, and other map features. Always carry a physical map as a backup, even if you’re using a digital version. And don’t forget to check the weather forecast before heading out; Snowdonia’s weather can be quite unpredictable.

OS Maps

Snowdon / Yr Wyddfa

OS Explorer Active Maps:

  • 1:25 000 scale (4 cm to 1 km – 2½ inches to 1 mile).
  • Laminated with a weatherproof finish, also suitable for dry-wipe pens. 
  • Great for walkers, hikers, cyclists, families, dog walkers, and horse riders.
  • Includes roads, rights of way, permissive paths and bridleways, plus essential visitor information.
  • Free digital download included.

The Best Walks in Snowdonia / Eryri


Snowdon via Pyg Track

The Pyg Track is often described as the ‘classic’ route up Snowdon, steeped in history and legend. It offers a balanced blend of challenge and scenic beauty, making it a popular choice for both beginners and experienced walkers. The route is well-maintained and simple to follow, providing possibly the best scenery of any of the Snowdon routes.

DISTANCE

10 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

3-4 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

790 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

What to Expect

As you make your way up, you’ll be flanked by the grand cliffs of Crib Goch and Y Lliwedd. The path takes you past the stunning lakes of Llyn Llydaw and Glaslyn, culminating in a final steep zigzagging ascent to the summit. The Pyg Track also offers the least amount of vertical ascent among the Snowdon routes, making it a good option for those less experienced in hillwalking.

The usual starting point is the Pen-y-Pass car park, postcode: LL55 4NU. The car park fills up quickly, especially during weekends, so consider using the Sherpa Bus service from Llanberis if you’re not an early riser.


Snowdon via Miners Track

The Miners’ Track is a fantastic option for those looking for a less strenuous ascent to Snowdon’s summit. It’s particularly well-suited for families and less experienced hikers. The route is rich in history, originally built to serve the Britannia Copper Mines.

DISTANCE

13 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

4-5 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

793 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

What to Expect

The walk starts off relatively flat, passing by the beautiful lakes of Llyn Teyrn and Llyn Llydaw. As you approach the ruins of the old copper mines, the path becomes steeper, eventually merging with the Pyg Track for the final ascent. The Miners’ Track offers a unique blend of Snowdonia’s industrial past and natural beauty.

Snowdon Walks

The usual starting point is the Pen-y-Pass car park, postcode: LL55 4NU. This car park is popular and fills up quickly, so consider using the Sherpa Bus service from Llanberis or Nant Peris.


Snowdon via Rhyd Ddu Path

The Rhyd Ddu Path is a quieter alternative to the more popular routes up Snowdon, offering a sense of solitude and tranquillity. It’s a fantastic choice for those looking to escape the crowds while still enjoying a challenging ascent. I’ve walked this route a few times and I’ve enjoyed it every time. It definitely makes my list of the best walks in Snowdonia.

DISTANCE

11.5 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

3-4 hrs 10

ELEVATION GAIN

888 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

What to Expect

The path takes you through a variety of landscapes, including open moorland and rocky outcrops. It offers stunning views of the Nantlle Ridge and the surrounding valleys. The route also passes by the South Ridge, providing an option for a more challenging detour.

The starting point for this walk is the Rhyd Ddu car park. The Sherpa’r Wyddfa bus service offers convenient connections from Caernarfon and Porthmadog, making it accessible even without a car.


Snowdon via Crib Goch

The Crib Goch route is a heart-pounding adventure that offers more than just a walk; it’s a Grade 1 scramble that’s not for the faint-hearted.

The arête of Crib Goch provides an exhilarating experience that’s incredibly rewarding for those who dare. As you navigate this knife-edged ridge, you’ll be treated to panoramic views of Llyn Lydaw and the surrounding peaks, making every step worthwhile.

Snowdon via Crib Goch

For those looking for a challenge, this route is often included in the National Three Peaks Challenge and the Welsh 3000s, making it a bucket-list item for avid hikers. The walk is a diverse experience, combining elements of the Pyg Track and the Llanberis Path, offering a varied and engaging hiking experience.

DISTANCE

10 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

5-6 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

872 m

DIFFICULTY

Severe

What to Expect

The hike starts off with a steep ascent, so be prepared for an immediate incline. Once you reach the arête, you’ll find yourself on a narrow path with sheer drops on either side, requiring a good head for heights. Certain sections, like the ‘bad step’ and the Pinnacles, will require your full attention and both hands for scrambling. The route eventually joins the Miner’s Track, leading you back to your starting point.

The usual starting point is the Pen-y-Pass car park or Nant Gwynant laybys along the A4086 and A498.


Snowdon via Llanberis Path

The Llanberis Path is often considered the “tourist path,” and for good reason. It’s one of the longest routes to the summit but also one of the most gradual, making it accessible for walkers of all ages and abilities. As you ascend, you’ll pass through the Cwm Brwynog valley, which was once home to a close-knit community connected to the Faenol Estate. This adds a layer of historical depth to your journey, as you’ll see the ruins of this old community and even the remains of Capel Hebron, a chapel that was the heart and soul of this small community.

DISTANCE

14.5 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

4-5 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

988 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

What to Expect

The path is well-maintained and offers a steady, gradual ascent, making it ideal for beginners or those looking for a less strenuous hike. Along the way, you’ll enjoy views of the Dinorwig slate quarry and the beautiful lakes of Llyn Peris and Llyn Padarn. The route takes you past the Halfway House café, an ideal pit stop for a well-deserved break and some tasty refreshments. Do bear in mind, however, that the café operates on a seasonal schedule, so it’s worth checking its opening times before you set off.

The starting point for this walk is the Llanberis car park, which is easily accessible and offers ample parking.


Snowdon via Snowdon Ranger Path

The Snowdon Ranger Path is a gem for those looking to escape the crowds, as it’s located on the quieter west side of the mountain. This path is steeped in history, being one of the oldest routes up Snowdon. It was developed in the 18th century near Caernarfon, along what was then one of the county’s best toll roads. The path is considered one of the easier routes, requiring no hands-on scrambling, making it a long but manageable walk for most.

DISTANCE

12.5 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

4-5 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

945 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

What to Expect

The path starts with a zig-zag ascent from a farm, gradually levelling out before becoming steeper and rockier in the second half. You’ll have a view of the summit for most of the way, adding to the anticipation. The path eventually joins the Llanberis Path at Bwlch Glas for the final ascent. It’s also a bridleway, so don’t be surprised if you encounter cyclists descending from the summit.

The starting point is the Llyn Cwellyn Car Park, off the A4085. The car park is a Pay & Display facility, and it’s also served by the Sherpa bus service S3, making it accessible for those without a car.


Snowdon via Watkin Path

The Watkin Path is one of the most scenic routes up Snowdon, offering a variety of landscapes from woodland to open mountain terrain. It’s also one of the most challenging routes, with a steep ascent near the summit that requires careful navigation. This path was initially created by Sir Edward Watkin, a 19th-century railway entrepreneur, as a tourist route, and it has since become a favourite among seasoned hikers.

DISTANCE

12.5 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

4-5 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

1061 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

What to Expect

The path starts in the woodland around the Nant Gwynant valley, offering a tranquil beginning to your hike. As you ascend, the terrain becomes more rugged and steep, particularly as you approach the area known as the ‘scree slope,’ which requires careful footing. The final section is a steep climb that can be slippery in wet conditions, so good footwear is essential.

The starting point is Pont Bethania Car Park, Nant Gwynant, off the A498. The car park is a Pay & Display facility, and it’s also served by the Sherpa’r Wyddfa bus service S3, making it accessible for those without a car.


Tryfan North Ridge

Tryfan North Ridge is a must-do for anyone seeking a challenging and exhilarating experience. This route is the longest sustained Grade 1 scramble in Snowdonia, making it a favourite among thrill-seekers and seasoned hikers alike. The twin obelisks of Adam and Eve at the summit offer a unique opportunity for those daring enough to “jump” from one to the other, adding an extra layer of adventure to this already thrilling hike.

DISTANCE

6 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

2-3 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

664 m

DIFFICULTY

Severe

What to Expect

The scramble starts from Llyn Ogwen and takes you up to the summit of Tryfan. The route is a complex maze of different approaches and lines, making it a challenging but rewarding experience. You’ll encounter a variety of terrains, from boulders to sheer walls, requiring a good level of skill and confidence in scrambling. The route is particularly challenging in misty conditions, where prior knowledge of the terrain is essential.

Snowdonia Walks - Tryfan

The starting point for this route is almost anywhere below the mountain on the A5, depending on where you can find parking. One common starting point is the car park at SH659 601, which is near the Milestone Buttress.


The Glyders via Devil’s Kitchen

The Glyders via Devil’s Kitchen is a classic round of Snowdonia’s Glyder peaks that offers a unique blend of fabulous rock formations and challenging terrains. This route circles around one of the best examples of a glaciated valley in Britain, adding a geological twist to your hike. The path also takes you through the Devil’s Kitchen, a deep rock cleft that adds an element of mystery and excitement to the journey.

DISTANCE

10 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

3-4 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

805 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

What to Expect

The hike starts at Ogwen Cottage and takes you through a variety of terrains, from the small tarn in a hanging valley to the plateau of the Glyders. The route is a serious mountain challenge with some challenging sections, especially on top of the Glyders where good map and compass skills are essential. The delicately balanced Cantilever Stone and the imposing rock tower Castell y Gwynt (Castle of the Winds) are some of the highlights you’ll encounter.

I’ve walked this route twice and I’m yet to see the amazing views due to thick fog on both visits. But that’s just a good excuse to head back for a third time.

The Glyders via Devil’s Kitchen

The starting point for this hike is near Ogwen Cottage, with the OS grid reference SH 649 603. Parking is allowed along the A5 by Llyn Ogwen and at Ogwen Cottage (pay-and-display), but it can get very busy in summer.


Cadair Idris via Minffordd Path

The Minffordd Path up Cadair Idris is a captivating route that offers a blend of natural beauty and challenge. This path is particularly popular for its steep ascent, which quickly rewards hikers with stunning views over Llyn Cau and the surrounding valleys. It’s a route that provides a sense of accomplishment, making it a favourite among those looking to conquer one of Snowdonia’s most iconic peaks.

DISTANCE

10 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

3-4 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

940 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

What to Expect

The Minffordd Path is the shortest but steepest of the routes to the summit of Cadair Idris. Starting near the Visitor Centre, you’ll initially climb a long flight of steep rocky steps. As you ascend, the path takes you along the ridge above Llyn Cau, offering breathtaking views that make the challenging climb worthwhile. Once you reach the summit, you’ll be greeted by panoramic vistas that stretch across southern Snowdonia. It’s essential to be cautious on the descent, as it’s easy to miss the path and end up walking towards Dolgellau.

The starting point for the Minffordd Path is near the Visitor Centre and café. Parking is available at Dôl Idris, which is run by Snowdonia National Park and is chargeable. Make sure to arrive early, especially during busy times, as the car park can fill up quickly.


Cnicht

Cnicht, often referred to as the “Welsh Matterhorn” due to its distinctive pointed shape, is a peak that offers a relatively short but rewarding hike. The mountain is less crowded than some of the more famous peaks in Snowdonia, making it a great option for those looking for a quieter experience. The summit provides panoramic views that stretch across the Moelwynion range, Porthmadog, and even as far as Cardigan Bay on a clear day.

DISTANCE

8 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

2-3 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

574 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

What to Expect

The hike up Cnicht is straightforward but involves some steep sections and minor scrambling. The path starts in the village of Croesor and follows a well-defined route up to the summit. Along the way, you’ll pass through open moorland and rocky outcrops, offering a varied and interesting landscape. The final ascent to the summit is steep but manageable, and the effort is well rewarded with stunning views.

Cnicht, Snowdonia

The starting point for this hike is in the village of Croesor. There is a small car park near the village hall, which is free but can fill up quickly, especially during weekends and holidays. Public transport options are limited, so driving is the most convenient way to reach the starting point.


Moel Siabod

Moel Siabod is a solitary peak that stands apart from the main clusters of mountains in Snowdonia, offering a unique hiking experience. The mountain is known for its 360-degree summit views, which include the Snowdon Horseshoe, the Glyders, and even the distant peaks of the Carneddau range. It’s a less crowded alternative to some of the more popular routes, making it ideal for those seeking solitude and a connection with nature.

DISTANCE

10.5 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

3-4 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

740 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

What to Expect

The hike usually starts from the village of Capel Curig and follows a well-marked path up to the summit. The initial part of the hike is relatively easy, taking you through fields and over streams. As you ascend, the terrain becomes more rugged, with some sections requiring a bit of scrambling. The summit is a broad plateau, offering plenty of space to relax and take in the views.

The starting point is usually from the Plas y Brenin National Outdoor Centre car park in Capel Curig. The car park is spacious and usually has plenty of availability. However, it’s always a good idea to arrive early during peak seasons.


Nantlle Ridge

The Nantlle Ridge is one of Snowdonia’s lesser-known gems, offering a linear ridge walk that provides a sense of true mountain adventure. The route is less frequented than other popular walks in the area, making it an excellent choice for those seeking solitude and unspoiled natural beauty. The ridge itself is a series of peaks that offer varied and engaging walking, with each summit providing its own unique view of the surrounding landscape.

DISTANCE

14 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

5-6 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

1215 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

What to Expect

The walk is a point-to-point route, so you’ll need to arrange transport back to the starting point or make it a circular walk by descending one of the alternative routes. The terrain is rugged and involves some scrambling, especially around the higher peaks. The route is exposed in places, so it’s essential to be prepared for all weather conditions. The walk offers a mix of steep ascents, descents, and flat sections, providing a varied and challenging day out.

The typical starting point for the Nantlle Ridge is the small village of Rhyd Ddu, where there is a public car park. Another option is to start from the village of Nantlle, but parking is more limited there.


Yr Eifl

Yr Eifl, also known as The Rivals, is a group of mountains on the Llŷn Peninsula that offer a different perspective on Snowdonia. The peaks are lower than many of Snowdonia’s giants, but what they lack in height, they make up for in character and views. From the summit, you can see across to Anglesey, the Irish Sea, and even the Wicklow Mountains in Ireland on a clear day.

DISTANCE

6.5 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

2-3 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

404 m

DIFFICULTY

Easy

What to Expect

The hike is moderate in difficulty and takes you through a variety of landscapes, including heathland, rocky outcrops, and ancient woodlands. The route is well-marked but does involve some steep sections and minor scrambling. The summit of Yr Eifl is home to an ancient hillfort, Tre’r Ceiri, which adds an element of historical interest to the hike.

Yr Eifl Walk in Snowdonia

The usual starting point for this hike is the car park near the village of Llithfaen. The car park is free but can get busy during weekends and holidays, so it’s advisable to arrive early.


Cwm Idwal

Cwm Idwal is a classic glacial cirque in the heart of Snowdonia, offering a relatively easy walk that is rich in both geological interest and natural beauty. The area is a National Nature Reserve and is renowned for its rare flora and fauna. It’s a fantastic choice for families, nature enthusiasts, and those new to hiking, providing an accessible introduction to the wonders of Snowdonia.

DISTANCE

4 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

1 hr

ELEVATION GAIN

113 m

DIFFICULTY

Easy

What to Expect

The walk around Cwm Idwal is a circular route that takes you along the shores of Llyn Idwal, a small lake that sits at the base of the towering cliffs of Glyder Fawr and Glyder Fach. The path is well-maintained and relatively flat, making it suitable for all ages and abilities. Along the way, you’ll have the opportunity to explore boulder fields, waterfalls, and unique plant species.

Cwm Idwal Snowdonia

The starting point for this walk is the Ogwen Cottage car park, which is situated on the A5.


Fisherman’s Path and Cwm Bychan

The Fisherman’s Path and Cwm Bychan walk is a circular route that offers a blend of natural beauty and historical significance. The path takes you through the Aberglaslyn Gorge, a spectacular sight, and up to Cwm Bychan, offering a mix of steep hills and rough terrain. It’s a walk that promises both adventure and natural beauty, making it a must-try for those with a good level of fitness and navigation skills.

DISTANCE

9 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

2-3 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

348 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

What to Expect

The walk starts in Beddgelert and takes you down the Fisherman’s Path through the Aberglaslyn Gorge. The path is mainly over polished rock and can be dangerous when wet. Some parts are awkward to manoeuvre around, but metal handles are in place to assist you. The route then ascends to Cwm Bychan, revealing views towards Penrhyndeudraeth and Harlech. The path continues until you get to the bwlch above Grib Ddu, where views of Snowdon open up. From there, you descend to Llyn Dinas and follow the track back to Beddgelert.

The starting point for this walk is the Snowdonia National Park Car Park in Beddgelert.


Carnedd Llewelyn

Carnedd Llewelyn is the highest peak in the Carneddau range and the third highest in Wales, making it a must-visit for serious hikers. The mountain offers a challenging yet rewarding experience, with its rugged terrain and panoramic views of the surrounding landscape. It’s a less crowded alternative to Snowdon, providing a sense of solitude and a closer connection to nature.

DISTANCE

14 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

4-5 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

984 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

What to Expect

The hike to Carnedd Llewelyn is not for the casual walker; it involves a steep ascent and some scrambling. The terrain is varied, featuring rocky paths, grassy slopes, and occasional boulder fields. Once you reach the summit, you’ll be rewarded with breathtaking views that stretch as far as the Isle of Anglesey on a clear day. The descent can be equally challenging, so make sure you’re well-prepared.

The typical starting point for this hike is the Ogwen Cottage car park, located off the A5. It’s a popular spot, so arriving early is advisable, especially during peak seasons.


Pen yr Ole Wen

Pen yr Ole Wen is the seventh-highest mountain in Wales and is often considered the gateway to the Carneddau range. Its distinct, steep-sided shape makes it an iconic feature in the Snowdonia landscape. The mountain offers a variety of routes, each providing its own set of challenges and rewards, making it a versatile choice for hikers of different skill levels.

DISTANCE

7 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

2-3 hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

780 m

DIFFICULTY

Moderate

What to Expect

The ascent to Pen yr Ole Wen can be steep and requires a good level of fitness. Depending on the route you choose, you may encounter rocky paths, scree slopes, and even some light scrambling. The summit offers stunning views of the Ogwen Valley and the surrounding peaks, including Tryfan and the Glyders. It’s a rewarding hike that offers a sense of accomplishment upon reaching the top.

Pen yr Ole Wen, Snowdonia

The most common starting point for this hike is the Ogwen Cottage car park, just like for Carnedd Llewelyn. It’s advisable to arrive early, especially during the busy summer months, to secure a parking spot.


The Welsh 3000s

The Welsh 3000s is not just a walk; it’s an epic challenge that takes you across the 15 highest peaks in Wales, all over 3,000 feet, within 24 hours. This route is a rite of passage for serious hikers and offers an unparalleled sense of accomplishment. The journey covers a variety of terrains and offers some of the most breathtaking views in Snowdonia.

DISTANCE

43 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

12+ hrs

ELEVATION GAIN

3061 m

DIFFICULTY

Severe

What to Expect

This is a strenuous and demanding route that requires meticulous planning, a high level of fitness, and excellent navigation skills. You’ll traverse rocky terrains, steep ascents, and some scrambling sections. The weather can be highly variable, so be prepared for all conditions. Given the length and difficulty of the route, it’s advisable to undertake this challenge with a group and to inform someone of your plans.

The challenge typically starts at the summit of Snowdon and ends at Foel Fras. However, you can choose to do it in reverse. Either way, logistics such as transport need to be well thought out in advance.


The Snowdonia Slate Trail

The Snowdonia Slate Trail is a remarkable long-distance walk that offers a unique perspective of Snowdonia, focusing on its rich industrial heritage. This trail takes you on a journey through the historic slate quarries and mining areas that were once the lifeblood of the local economy. What sets it apart is the opportunity to explore this history at a leisurely pace, typically tackled over multiple days. It’s a walk that allows you to delve deep into the past, unravelling the stories of the people who worked in these challenging conditions.

DISTANCE

134 km return

ESTIMATED TIME

5-7 days

ELEVATION GAIN

4108 m

DIFFICULTY

Hard

What to Expect

This walk is not about conquering towering peaks but rather about immersing yourself in the remnants of a bygone era. You’ll pass through old quarry workings, picturesque villages, and scenic landscapes that showcase the region’s industrial past. The Snowdonia Slate Trail is a relatively easy walk compared to some of the more demanding mountain hikes, making it accessible to a wider range of walkers. It’s an opportunity to step back in time and gain a profound understanding of Snowdonia’s history.

The starting point for The Snowdonia Slate Trail is in the city of Bangor, not far from the famous Menai Bridge. This location allows you to embark on a journey that spans various sections and landscapes, offering flexibility in how you choose to explore this historical gem.


Snowdonia, with its towering peaks, serene lakes, and rich history, beckons adventurers of all kinds. From the adrenaline rush of Crib Goch to the tranquil beauty of Cwm Idwal, Snowdonia offers diverse experiences for every walker.

Whether you seek adventure or solace, Snowdonia has a path for you. Pack your boots, grab your map, and step into the embrace of Snowdonia. Start your adventure today and discover the magic of this extraordinary region.

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